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All About Minneapolis

Minneapolis, Minnesota

Minneapolis is the county seat of Hennepin County, and larger of the Twin Cities, the 16th-largest metropolitan area in the United States, containing about 3.5 million residents. As of 2015, Minneapolis is the largest city in the state of Minnesota and 46th-largest in the United States with a population of 410,939. Minneapolis and Saint Paul anchor the second-largest economic center in the Midwest, after Chicago.

Minneapolis lies on both banks of the Mississippi River, just north of the river’s confluence with the Minnesota River, and adjoins Saint Paul, the state’s capital. The city is abundantly rich in water, with thirteen lakes, wetlands, the Mississippi River, creeks and waterfalls, many connected by parkways in the Chain of Lakes and the Grand Rounds National Scenic Byway. It was once the world’s flour milling capital and a hub for timber. The city and surrounding region is the primary business center between Chicago and Seattle, with Minneapolis proper containing America’s fifth-highest concentration of Fortune 500 companies. As an integral link to the global economy, Minneapolis is categorized as a global city. Noted for its strong music and performing arts scenes, Minneapolis is home to both the award-winning Guthrie Theater and the historic First Avenue nightclub. Reflecting the region’s status as an epicenter of folk, funk, and alternative rock music, the city served as the launching pad for several of the 20th century’s most influential musicians, including Bob Dylan and Prince.

The name Minneapolis is attributed to Charles Hoag, the city’s first schoolteacher, who combined mni, a Dakota Sioux word for water, and polis, the Greek word for city. (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minneapolis)

Things To Do In Minneapolis:

Come Spend A Day In Minneapolis!

Lake Harriet
Minneapolis is home to Lake Harriet, which covers almost 350 acres, plus a 67-acre coastal region. The lake features hiking trails, bike paths and two beaches. Professional lifeguards are on duty during swimming hours.

Stone Arch Bridge
One of Minneapolis’ most striking features is the Stone Arch Bridge, a beautiful and majestic bridge that spans the Mississippi River. The bridge is particularly lovely at night, when recessed lighting illuminates the undersides of its arches.

Minnehaha Park
Spanning over 190 acres and accented by a huge waterfall, Minnehaha Park offers pristine areas for hiking, photography, birdwatching, fishing and other activities. During warm weather, the park is a popular picnic and concert venue.

Lake Calhoun
Located in the Chain of Lakes, Minneapolis’ Lake Calhoun is a prime destination for swimming, fishing, tubing, boating, waterskiing, parasailing, kite flying and other enjoyable waterfront activities.

Grand Rounds Scenic Byway
One of the most extensive routes in the area is the Grand Rounds Scenic Byway. It features over 40 miles of bike trails that run throughout the entire city in addition to the general driving route for cars.

University of Minnesota
The University of Minnesota offers four coordinate campuses across the state. As one of the nation’s large schools, it features 250 student exchange programs, various degrees up to a doctoral level and multiple sports teams.

Minneapolis Sculpture Garden
Art and nature lovers enjoy spending time at the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden, a series of outdoor art installations that fuels the imagination as its delights the eyes.

St. Anthony Falls
St. Anthony Falls was long used as a main source of power during the 1700s and 1800s, but damage in the late 1800s led the US Army Corps of Engineers to make improvements to stabilize the falls.

Loring Park
Featuring a sculpture garden, Loring Park houses a variety of fountains in unique shapes, a highlight being a dandelion fountain. The William Berry House, a historic Victorian home, is located on the park’s grounds.

Riverview Theater
Opened in 1948, Riverview Theater is a single-screen movie theater that displays first-run Hollywood movies along with art films. It offers digital presentation, high-back seats, a lounge area with a television, stadium seating and a snack bar. (source: http://www.tripbuzz.com/free-things-to-do/minneapolis-mn)

Education in Minneapolis

About Minneapolis Educational System

Minneapolis Public Schools enroll 36,370 students in public primary and secondary schools. The district administers about 100 public schools including 45 elementary schools, seven middle schools, seven high schools, eight special education schools, eight alternative schools, 19 contract alternative schools, and five charter schools. With authority granted by the state legislature, the school board makes policy, selects the superintendent, and oversees the district’s budget, curriculum, personnel, and facilities. Students speak 90 different languages at home and most school communications are printed in English, Hmong, Spanish, and Somali. About 44% of students in the Minneapolis Public School system graduate, which ranks the 6th worst out of the nation’s 50 largest cities. Some students attend public schools in other school districts chosen by their families under Minnesota’s open enrollment statute. Besides public schools, the city is home to more than 20 private schools and academies and about 20 additional charter schools.

Minneapolis’ collegiate scene is dominated by the main campus of the University of Minnesota where more than 50,000 undergraduate, graduate, and professional students attend 20 colleges, schools, and institutes. The graduate school programs ranked highest in 2007 were counseling and personnel services, chemical engineering, psychology, macroeconomics, applied mathematics and non-profit management. A Big Ten school and home of the Golden Gophers, the University of Minnesota is the fourth largest campus among U.S. public 4-year universities in terms of enrollment.

As of 2010, the University of Minnesota (Minneapolis campus above) has the fourth-largest student body of U.S. public 4-year universities.

Augsburg College, Minneapolis College of Art and Design, and North Central University are private four-year colleges. Minneapolis Community and Technical College, the private Dunwoody College of Technology, Globe University/Minnesota School of Business, and Art Institutes International Minnesota provide career training. St. Mary’s University of Minnesota has a Twin Cities campus for its graduate and professional programs. Capella University, Minnesota School of Professional Psychology, and Walden University are headquartered in Minneapolis and some others including the public four-year Metropolitan State University and the private four-year University of St. Thomas have campuses there.

The Hennepin County Library system began to operate the city’s public libraries in 2008. The Minneapolis Public Library, founded by T. B. Walker in 1885, faced a severe budget shortfall for 2007, and was forced to temporarily close three of its neighborhood libraries. The new downtown Central Library designed by César Pelli opened in 2006.[249] Ten special collections hold over 25,000 books and resources for researchers, including the Minneapolis Collection and the Minneapolis Photo Collection. At recent count 1,696,453 items in the system are used annually and the library answers over 500,000 research and fact-finding questions each year. (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minneapolis#Education)

History of Minneapolis:

Minneapolis is rich in history!

Dakota Sioux had long been the region’s sole residents when French explorers arrived around 1680. For a time relations were based on fur trading. Gradually more European-American settlers arrived, competing for game and other resources with the Dakota.

In the early 19th century, the United States acquired this territory from France. It gradually established posts here. Fort Snelling was built in 1819 by the United States Army, and it attracted traders, settlers and merchants, spurring growth in the area. The United States government pressed the Mdewakanton band of the Dakota to sell their land, allowing people arriving from the East to settle here. The Minnesota Territorial Legislature authorized present-day Minneapolis as a town in 1856 on the Mississippi’s west bank. Minneapolis incorporated as a city in 1867, the year rail service began between Minneapolis and Chicago. It later joined with the east-bank city of St. Anthony in 1872.

Minneapolis developed around Saint Anthony Falls, the highest waterfall on the Mississippi River and a source of power for its early industry. Forests in northern Minnesota were a valuable resource for the lumber industry, which operated seventeen sawmills on power from the waterfall. By 1871, the west river bank had twenty-three businesses, including flour mills, woolen mills, iron works, a railroad machine shop, and mills for cotton, paper, sashes, and planing wood. Due to the occupational hazards of milling, six local sources of artificial limbs were competing in the prosthetics business by the 1890s. The farmers of the Great Plains grew grain that was shipped by rail to the city’s thirty-four flour mills. Millers have used hydropower elsewhere since the 1st century B.C., but the results in Minneapolis between 1880 and 1930 were so remarkable the city has been described as “the greatest direct-drive waterpower center the world has ever seen.

A father of modern milling in America and founder of what became General Mills, Cadwallader C. Washburn converted his business from gristmills to truly revolutionary technology, including “gradual reduction” processing by steel and porcelain roller mills capable of producing premium-quality pure white flour very quickly. Some ideas were developed by William Dixon Gray and some acquired through industrial espionage from the Hungarians by William de la Barre.[19] Charles A. Pillsbury and C.A. Pillsbury Company across the river were barely a step behind, hiring Washburn employees to immediately use the new methods. The hard red spring wheat that grows in Minnesota became valuable ($.50 profit per barrel in 1871 increased to $4.50 in 1874,) and Minnesota “patent” flour was recognized at the time as the best in the world. (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minneapolis#History)

Minneapolis’s Neighborhood

Check out Minneapolis’s Neighborhood

Minneapolis is a large city located in the state of Minnesota. With a population of 410,939 people and 116 constituent neighborhoods, Minneapolis is the largest community in Minnesota. Minneapolis has a large stock of pre-World War II architecture, making it one of the older and more historic cities in the country.

Minneapolis is a decidedly white-collar city, with fully 87.91% of the workforce employed in white-collar jobs, well above the national average. Overall, Minneapolis is a city of professionals, sales and office workers and service providers. There are especially a lot of people living in Minneapolis who work in office and administrative support (11.38%), management occupations (10.73%) and sales jobs (9.67%).

Minneapolis is a popular destination for single career-starters. One thing that you will notice when you are out and about town is that there is a large population of people who are young, single, educated, and upwardly-mobile career starters out at restaurants, listening to live music, and enjoying other activities. They are a real visible part of the culture of Minneapolis. This makes Minneapolis a good place to live for young professionals. With so many people in this demographic, Minneapolis presents many opportunities for single professionals to enjoy themselves, socialize, and to create lasting relationships.

Minneapolis is a big city, and with that comes lots of benefits. One benefit is that most big cities have public transit, but Minneapolis really shines when it comes to the extensiveness and use of its public transit system. More than most large American cities, Minneapolis citizens use public transit daily to get to and from work. And while there are transportation options, most people in Minneapolis ride the bus. Whereas in some cities one is destined to sit in traffic every morning to get to work and every evening to get home, in Minneapolis a lot leave their cars at home (if they even choose to own one), and hop a ride on the bus.

Minneapolis is an extremely ethnically-diverse city. The people who call Minneapolis home describe themselves as belonging to a variety of racial and ethnic groups. The greatest number of Minneapolis residents report their race to be White, followed by Black or African-American. Important ancestries of people in Minneapolis include German, Irish, Norwegian, Swedish, English and Polish. (source: https://www.neighborhoodscout.com/mn/minneapolis/)

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    ALLISON SELDEN Mortgage

    Allison Selden

    Loan Officer

    Allison Selden is an expert in helping clients through the mortgage process by educating them to make the best decision. As a licensed loan officer with Waterstone Mortgage, she specialize in purchases and refinances. Your home is one of the biggest purchases you will ever make, put your mortgage in the hands of someone you can trust.